jim-bo52

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About jim-bo52

  1. Speaker wiring

    Thank you for the information on my subject questions. jim Would crosstalk really be a problem with a mono signal source feeding both channels of the amp? Would crosstalk effect the (-) wire of the other pair and reduce signal strength at the speakers? Thanks Jim It is not good practice and not recommended to do wiring this way for several reasons. 1) You have a common point of failure for both channels. If the one wire goes bad you loose everything. 2) The return line would be carrying twice the current and would have to be of a larger gauge negating the cost of just using three wires. 3) You are talking audio not household electrical. In an electrical system each branch off of a main is individually current limited with a breaker as well as the individual main thus limiting the maximum current on the common/neutral. 4) Due to the way the electrical codes are written in some areas 70 volt systems fall under the jurisdiction of the electrical inspector because they are above 50 volts. This type of wiring installation would not pass inspection. 5) If at any time someone decides to have separate signal there could be crosstalk in the lines and your installation practices could be called into question. The excepted practice and rule in the industry is to use an individual pair of wires for each run off of the output of an amplifier.
  2. Speaker wiring

    Would crosstalk really be a problem with a mono signal source feeding both channels of the amp? Would crosstalk effect the (-) wire of the other pair and reduce signal strength at the speakers? Thanks Jim
  3. In a 70v outdoor p.a. system I have 2 zones each run off a cts 1200. Each zone is fed from it's own channel, the signal source is mono and includes announcer and music. My question is do I need 4 conductor wire for the 2 zones, 1 + and 1 - for each zone or can I share the -'s and use 3 conductor wire. My thought comes from electrical wiring that shares a neutral wire in 220/110 volt circuits. Thanks Jim