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Is this to much power?


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#1 jamesw123

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 01:11 PM

Ok check this out.

My amp is:  3200w at 4ohm/bridged
Speakers:   2 at  400w rms, 8ohm each

Now if I parallel them that gives me a range of 1280w-2000w at 4ohm
using the 1.6 to 2.5 rule.

Now bridging them to my amp at 3200w would give each speaker 1600w

The speakers are 500w max each so at the 2 to 4 rule
thats 1000w-2000w

Now the 1600w to each speaker looks like too much compared to the 400w rms and 500w peak, but considering the need for headroom and these rules, assuming I've applied them correctly, this looks to be just about right.
      
             PLEASE let me know if this is right

I have learned a great deal hear.  THANKS to everybody smile.gif

#2 Elliot Thompson

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 07:14 AM

Your math is wrong.

If the speakers rated 400 watts rms, then its the following;

400 watts rms

800 watts program

1600 watts peak

Now. The rule is  1.5 - 2 times the rms, which is 600 - 800 watts

Bridging the amp offering 3200 watts continuous, will give you 1600 watts
each woofer, exceeding the program rating. Once you exceed the program
rating of any woofer on a continuous rating, you are overloading the
speaker. Program rating is the maximum a speaker can handle on a
long term basis. Peak is just that, Peak. Which is a fraction of a second.

If the speaker is 500 watts Peak, its 250 watts Program, 125 watts rms.
I would recomend you contacting the speaker manufacter and get the
right numbers to be on the safe side.

Best Regards,

Elliot Thompson

#3 Bud Bolf

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 08:46 AM

QUOTE(Elliot Thompson @ Apr 11 2006, 08:14 AM)
Your math is wrong.

If the speakers rated 400 watts rms, then its the following;

400 watts rms

800 watts program

1600 watts peak

Now. The rule is  1.5 - 2 times the rms, which is 600 - 800 watts

Bridging the amp offering 3200 watts continuous, will give you 1600 watts
each woofer, exceeding the program rating. Once you exceed the program
rating of any woofer on a continuous rating, you are overloading the
speaker. Program rating is the maximum a speaker can handle on a
long term basis. Peak is just that, Peak. Which is a fraction of a second.

If the speaker is 500 watts Peak, its 250 watts Program, 125 watts rms.
I would recomend you contacting the speaker manufacter and get the
right numbers to be on the safe side.

Best Regards,

Elliot Thompson
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Hi James,
Elliot is correct, except some will say that if properly LIMITED you could actually go to the Peak rating, though most adhere to the 1.5 to 2.0 ratio of Power amp to RMS / Continuos rating of the Speakers at the appropriate Ohms.

Read here: How Much Power?

No matter what, you should have a Limiter on your System to be safe.
If you are a bit on the lower side of the Power ratio and if you do clip a little,
your speakers voice coil could take it a bit more because less Power Amp / less heat on your voice coil.
If you are heavy on the Power ratio and you now clip, you can do much more Damage to your speakers voice coil because Heat is the real enemy!
Now that does not mean to underpower your speakers, what it means is
be aware of this and if you are throwing max power at the speakers you need a good limiter!
Those same varying clips at high power with no limiting will fry your speakers much quicker!  

So, the best safety that you can offer your speakers and overall system
is a DSP such as a DriveRack that will do it all from Crossover to EQ to Parametrics, Delay, Feedback, RTA Limiting etc.. and of course no matter what Power ratio that you use, properly set your maximum Gain Structure.
Prevent Clipping at ALL costs!

Besides your question on power what are your plans for these speakers?
When you say two 400 watt RMS speakers parallelled, is that two speakers in a cab or two single driver cabs?

Thanks,
    Bud