Jump to content


CE4000 Pops GFCI


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 genesisdj

genesisdj
  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 20 August 2006 - 08:43 AM

Hello.   I have a CE4000 that is out of warranty, that when I plug into a GFCI outlet it trips the GFCI.    When I do outside gigs I kept having this problem, and traced it down to this amp.    I am guessing it is leaking power somewhere and not returning all the current back to the neutral, then because of this tripping the GFCI outlet.   Has anyone else had this issue?   How could I go about trying to find the problem?   The amplifier itself works fine on any regular outlet.


Thanks.

#2 Lou

Lou

    Power User

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 62 posts

Posted 09 October 2006 - 12:38 PM

Is it a fairly long run to the GFCI? I bet you've got some RF leaving the amp and the GFCI thinks its an AC fault.

#3 DGlass

DGlass

    .

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,541 posts

Posted 30 October 2006 - 02:18 PM

I would look at using a motor start breaker for amplifiers. All amplifiers have a bit of in-rush current as they are starting up. Most of the common off the shelf Ground Fault Breakers see this sudden rush of current as a ground fault and will trip.

#4 jgriggs

jgriggs
  • Members
  • 14 posts

Posted 03 November 2006 - 09:25 AM

QUOTE(DGlass @ Oct 30 2006, 02:18 PM)
I would look at using a motor start breaker for amplifiers. All amplifiers have a bit of in-rush current as they are starting up. Most of the common off the shelf Ground Fault Breakers see this sudden rush of current as a ground fault and will trip.
View Post


This is not true.
GFCI only trip on an inbalance of Line hot versus Line neutral current.
If large start currents tripped them, every hair dryer and air compressor (Bathroom and Garage, both now required) would trip them.

More info.
http://www.codecheck.com/gfci_principal.htm

#5 DGlass

DGlass

    .

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,541 posts

Posted 03 November 2006 - 10:32 AM

OK maybe I over simplified the statement. What I was trying to say was...it is possible the GFCI he is using is sensing the turn on rush of current and it is more than the GFCI wants to handle and is tripping. We have found that most GFCIs are more sensitive to sudden current rushes.
Besides that GFCI have been know to become faster acting as they are overly tripped.
Either way I would still recommend a motor start breaker.