• Content count

  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About coherent_guy

Contact Methods

  • ICQ
  1. Hi, That is normal for the CE1000 and CE2000 amps, the fan only runs after some temperature threshold is passed, and then the fan speed is variable. This is mentioned in the manual but not explained in much detail. When the amp is powered on the fan does not run and only starts if it gets warm. The fan speed also varies, seemingly with the input signal being present or not, as well as temperature. I like this feature, others it seems do not. I know of no way to turn the fan on constantly, although I imagine Crown could of added a switch to change between the two modes of operation. I've had no problems with my CE1000 overheating, but I use it free standing, it seems when used in an enclosure people are reporting there are problems, but I find it hard to believe Crown would have overlooked that. I'm guessing that the temperature sensor is on a heat sink, so the temperature of the chassis or air passing through it will not alone activate the fan. I've noticed that the power transformer can be warm after being on for hours, but if the amp has been idle, the fan may not be on. I guess I don't understand what your problem is, and a post done after yours that discusses this subject did not make sense to me. If you care to explain it in more detail, I'm listening...
  2. Hi, Your fan is acting normally, it is what Crown calls a proportional speed fan, it seems to be a "smart fan" and only runs when necessary. I have a CE1000 which is very similar to your amp. At turn on and idle, the fan won't run. I had to crank it up for a while to get it to come on, I also thought it might not be working at first. I started using it in bridged mode to drive a subwoofer, and the fan came on after a while. I noticed when I stopped the signal source, the fan almost immediately slowed down, as if the fan speed controller was tracking the input signal and not only the temperature. The fan speed seems to be continuously variable, not in steps like low, medium, and high. This behavior is different from how fans worked in the past, and I think it is an improvement. Why have a fan on when it is not needed, creating noise and pulling possibly dusty air through the unit constantly, there will likely be less dust build up inside the amp with this technique as well as minimizing fan noise. The CE series page on Crown's website mentions this feature. In my experience the fan will not come on when driving easy loads at low power outputs. Given that a CE2000 has more power output capability than my amp, it may take even more power demand to start your fan. Perhaps Crown should have warned users accustomed to the way fans worked in the past that the fan will run only when needed. Enjoy your amp!