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About mixwiz

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  1. You want to run 5 subs off one amp? Yes, that is crazy. I'd skip the SRX, center cluster EAW's, run in stereo and cross your fingers. You'd still be underpowered but it should give you better sound.
  2. Holy crap dude. I hope you're wearing ear plugs.
  3. Assuming you are running mono, best way would be to get a simple analogue 2 way cross over and another amp. Set the amp to parallel. Mixer to the crossover. High out put from the crossover to channel A of one of your amps (By setting the amp to parallel, the signal will get fed from channel a to . Low out from xover to sub amp (also set to parallel). Connect speakers to amp outs. For a starting poing, set the xover up at 100hz. This will feed all content below 100hz to the subs and above to the tops. Hope this makes sense.
  4. I've been running my SRX 718S (same driver as your box) with an XLS2500 bridged and it works really well. On several occassions, I ran a second sub and it worked fine. A couple times were outdoor gigs in 90 degree heat. Application was live music with mostly Kik and a little bass in the subs.
  5. If it sounds great, what problem are you trying to solve???
  6. Well, there are a couple different ways to go. Generally, you want an amp that is able to deliver about 2x continuous (which is normally about the same as program). Once you know what those ratings are, you have to make the decision to bridge or not to bridge your foh amps (forget it for the mons). Here is the conundrum: Bridging will allow you to hit your power goals cheaper (fewer amps) but at the sacrifice of reliability. Generally, you wont see much bridging in a permanent install. Mono is fine in IMHO. You've got some great speakers for that space and it should sound great. You probably want to think about your volume goals as it's a church, I doubt you'll want to run that rig right to the limit. If that is the case, you might be fine with lower powered amps. As a suggestion, if there is a local rental house, you could rent some different power amps and give em a try. One of the shops I use will knock off the cost of the rental if you by new gear from them so it's essentially a test drive. Hope this was helpful.
  7. Check out Audio star on ebay. Lowest I've seen on SRX. Shoot em an offer and you might be suprised. JBL has Maap pricing rules for their dealers which is why you see 718's at the same price all over the net. You can do better however. Like other posters have said, get what you really want. Buy once, cry once.
  8. Should work fine. You'll actually be a little underpowered. I run a xls 2500 bridged into a 718. sounds great and those speakers are tough.
  9. A little more info would help. What style music, how big a room, how many people do you play for, what is the rest of your gear etc. Below are the specs for the xti series: The 2000 puts out 800 watts per at 4 ohms. Assuming you had 8 ohm cabs, 2 per side would make 4 ohms per side with each speaker seeing 400 watts. You generally want about 1 1/2 times continous power so you'd look for cabs rated at around 250 watts. the 4000 puts out 1200 per at 4 so you'd want a cab that is rated around 800 watts or so. My general sense is that if you match subs and tops to these amps, you'll have a hard time keeping up with your subs. You might want to consider bridging the 2000 into a sub and using your 4000 for tops and mons. The last question is have you established a budget? This is all rough, rule of thumb info. Your mileage may vary. Hopefully you find this helpful
  10. Generally you don't want to use a guitar cab with a rack rig. Guitar cabs are part of the tonal change and each has their own sound. They aren't built to have flat frequency response. When you go to a rack system, the preamp and other things in the tone chain are doing the eq variations required to get good guitar sound. That is the part of the chain where you'll also get controllable distortion. By adding a guitar cab to the mix, you'll mess up that chain. You'd probably be better considering full range p/a style cabs. I know this is a crown forum and I love/own crown stuff but QSC k12 might be a great solution for your set up. Remember, I did say "generally". I've heard some guys get good tone out of a rack and a 1960 marshall cab. It's also likely that somewhere on the planet is a guy with a 58 gold top and dumble that sounds like crap which is why I said "generally".
  11. Your sub is rated at 400 watts program. The 1500 delivers 300 watts which is 75% of program. Not bad actually and you should be able to run one sub per side. Bridging to one will deliver a potential 1050 watts which significantly increases the chance the you'll let the magic smoke out of the cab. What is the rest of your signal chain? Is this a live app or DJ? what are your tops/mixer/x-over etc?
  12. Pretty simple actually. I'm assuming you have a crossover. You'll have to run a mono mix to accomplish what you want. Pan all the inputs on the mixer to one side (hard). Run that output from your mixer into one side of your xover. Low out from your xo to one side of the pwr amp and Hi out into the other. Speaker cable from Lo side into 1st sub. speaker cable from that sub to the other. Do the same with your tops and you are good to go.
  13. use one of your auxes for you DAW. as far as the rest of it being "old school", just because these methods have been around for a long time, doesn't make them wrong. Gain structure is gain structure.
  14. It might be easier to approach this from the other end. What exactly are you trying to accomplish? Do you want to take the time to build your own cabs? It's pretty tough to build a true full range cab. You might have better success with one really good seperate sub and a couple full range speakers. I'd suggest a crossover for a rig like that. You don't really need two subs for home use and one will generally sound better than two as you don't have to worry about power alleys etc. Essentially, figure out what the goal is (spl, coverage degrees etc) and then figure out what gear you need to accomplish it within your budget. I could be way off and maybe you want to build stuff and learn as you go which is perfectly cool too if you have the time and budget.
  15. Stereo bypass is the factory default. You aren't bypassing stereo but rather inactivating the built in x-over. Two things come to mind one of which was already mentioned: If you have one of the speaker's polarity different from the other, you'd get phase cancellation which would be most noticeable in bass. Seccondly, did you activate the "hi-pass" part of the dsp? If you did, turn it off for full range speakers. HPF is usefull if you are running the amp for vocal monitors as it will filter out freqs below a certain frequency. It's not helpful if you are trying to get full range sound.