Geoff St. Germaine

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About Geoff St. Germaine

  1. Like you mentioned, it takes a lot of power to drive very low frequency output. Your HTIB would be lucky to have much output below 40 Hz (specs say freq response down to 45 Hz, unknown level). Most guys using pro amps are using them for subwoofer duty shooting for output into the 10-15 Hz range and sometimes lower. Couple these needs with drivers that are quite insensitive and you wind up with a large power demand. To Andy, I believe that the testing was done with a regulated 120 V supply.
  2. 2500 watts? In a home theater? I've engineered metal bands Arsis and High On Fire, TOURING GRADE METAL BANDS, with a pair of subs that total 2500 watts and the very ground shook. I'm talking 115 dB continuous and 120+ signal peak. If you're doing that in your home, I'll bet your neighbors don't like you very much. It takes a lot more excursion, and hence power, to produce X dB at 15 Hz than it does at 30 or 40 Hz.
  3. Hi, I have a friend who's using an XS900 which is being driven by a home theater receiver to power a subwoofer. There seems to be a problem whereby the amp is clipping while the output doesn't seem sufficient for the setup. The receiver apparently only outputs 200 mV on the LFE to the XS900 and the XS900 requires 1.4 V to get full output. My question is, is it possible for a low input voltage to cause premature clipping? It doesn't make sense to me that this would happen based on what I understand of amplifier design, but he insists it's the only possibility. Basically he thinks that the amplifier will clip in a manner relative to the input voltage (ie at X dB difference you get clipping). My thoughts are either that the amp is defective or that the guy is getting full output but thinks he should be getting more. I can't convince him that it shouldn't work like this, but perhaps some with more expertise on these amps can help. Cheers, Geoff